Water, water everywhere

Jack Mytton Way Route 7: Roman Bank to Wheathill image

Distance

9 miles

Terrain

Stoned Tracks, lanes and cross field bridleways

Start from

Roman Bank, Rushbury

Nearest to

Craven Arms, Ludlow, Much Wenlock

Map reference

Lat/Long: 52.5129711405, -2.7072465925

OS: 352100

The route

Perhaps the prettiest ford in England a well created by her steed which saved the life of St Milburga and a patchwork of streams have made the Corvedale into a Garden of Eden.

The fertile soil of the Corvedale is due to the streams draining from Brown Clee. this was once the most populous part of Shropshire. Yet a few hundred feet higher, there was a losing struggle for existence. Wet summers and a mini ice age drove the villagers off the hills. The not-to-be-missed chapel at Heath is nearly all that remains but the village well is hidden in the corner of the field.

In Clee St Margaret the brook thinks it is a road. It flows along for 50 yards, goes round a bend before pouring over a charming little fall.

St Milburga was dying of thirst. Bloodhounds had pursued her for two days and nights. Her horse kicked the ground and a spring gushed forth. Refreshed, she made her escape. The well is in Stoke St Milborough.

Corve Dale

This fertile area, the Corve Dale, has been inhabited for many years. The remains of mediaeval settlements and motte and bailey castles prove testimony to this fact. Farming continues to be an important industry and many of the traditional buildings still remain. A you travel towards Broncroft you pass Broncroft Castle just off the Jack Mytton Way on the left.

Brown Clee

This area is a protected landscape; part of the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and designated as Open Access Land. Clee Burf and Abdon Burf are the twin summits that make up Brown Clee, the highest point in Shropshire. Both this hill and its neighbour Titterstone Clee were once a hive of activity with people mining the coal and ironstone which cap both summits.

Nordy Bank

Nordy Bank a magnificent Iron Age hill-fort is displayed in all its glory to your right. The ditches and ramparts are well preserved and the views are breathtaking.

Clee St Margaret

In Clee St Margaret you follow the brook along the road. Take time to enjoy this pretty village and its wildlife and flowers.